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INTRODUCTORY NOTES 
-  South Ronaldsay and Burray Ancestors' Signatures Project  - 


~~~ Lisa's informational notes for the user of this web site ~~~


 
 Purpose.

This web site aims to pinpoint possible locations of your ancestor's signature
in 19th-century documents, and then to provide you with the relevant source
information needed to obtain a copy of that signature from the holder of
the original document.  The actual images themselves are not shown - that is,
you will not find the visual examples of your ancestors' signatures here.
What you will find is an extracted index of 19th-century signatures. 
(If the source of your signature of interest is via the ScotlandsPeople web site,
images can be viewed on, and downloaded from, that site, for a fee.
ScotlandsPeople also allows you to purchase official paper copies
that can be mailed to you.)

 
 'South Ronaldsay and Burray Ancestors' Signatures Project'
will be an on-going project, as new sources for signatures are found.

Currently, the bulk of the project now on-line portrays signatures found in the civil
birth registers and civil death registers, for years 1855-1899, indexed on my web
sites, 'South Ronaldsay and Burray 19th-c. Births/Baptisms: Extracted Index'
and 'South Ronaldsay and Burray Civil Death Registers: Extracted Index'.


 
 Disclaimer and Other Information.


This site does not purport to show a complete index of all of the
 signatures found within 19th-century statutory registers of births and deaths.

At times the signatures in the old registers were difficult to read,
and transcriptions were done to the best of my ability.
It is recommended you consult the official registers for your own verification.

It is the actual signature of the "Informant of the birth to the Registrar" or the
"Informant of the death to the Registrar" that can be seen in the original record
of the civil register (remember, however, that some of our ancestors could not
write, in which case, only their "Mark" can be seen on the civil register for which
they happened to be the "Informant").  As I understand it, "Informants" as named
in the civil registers were those who gave at least some information regarding the
Newborn or the Deceased, to the Registrar, for each particular birth or death
record.  The information they gave to the Registrar may or may not have been
completely accurate.  With this in mind, while visiting this web site, please
remember that any familial relationships described on the individual surname
pages are relationships that the "Informant" conveyed to the Registrar around
the time of that particular birth or death.  I myself cannot vouch for the
information the "Informant" gave back in the 1800's, but if you have visited my
web sites relating to 19th-century Civil Birth Registers or 19th-century Civil
Death Registers
, you will notice several instances where I have made
corrections to information an "Informant" had provided which I have
learned, from later research, was probably inaccurate information.
However, on my 19th-century Civil Birth Registers or 19th-century Civil Death
Registers sites, I cannot guarantee that I have caught all inaccuracies a
19th-century "Informant" may have made, nor can I claim that
all of my 21st-century research is infallible.


ALL SPELLINGS SHOWN ARE SHOWN AS THEY WERE DEPICTED IN THE 1950s-1960s GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY of UTAH MICROFILM RECORDS, OR IN DIGITIZED RECORDS FOUND ON THE ScotlandsPeople WEB SITE, AS VIEWED AND TRANSCRIBED BY LISA CONRAD.

When handwriting could not be deciphered with certainty,
I enclosed the uncertain data within  {      }  , placing a best guess
within the brackets, or otherwise putting a  '?'  within the brackets.
ALSO PUT WITHIN BRACKETS  {      }
  ARE ANY NOTES by me - these not being in original.

THIS IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER, AS YOU USE THE INDEX.

Although original spellings were generally kept, when I felt
that SOME of the wordings or spellings needed additional
acknowledgment that they are indeed shown as depicted originally,
they were put within single quote marks, like so   >          '         '      
in order to re-emphasize this original wording or spelling.