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INFORMATION REGARDING PLACENAMES & SURNAMES 
-  Lisa's Additional Research Notes  -



On each page of  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  for every District,
transcriptions of the original census document are in  BLACK TEXT,
abbreviations & additional notes by Lisa are in  RED TEXT with a white background

 

  Placenames . . . .                  ( also see  Surnames below >    )

The placenames, or names of Households, shown in BLACK TEXT within the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section of this web site indicate the spelling as found on the transcript of the original enumeration document of the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census.

Placenames you see within brackets and in RED text, to the right of spellings of placenames in BLACK TEXT, are my own deductions regarding the placenames’ current spellings, if known.  To the extent of my knowledge, I have used modern, or else commonly used, spellings of placenames throughout the entire  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section  -  that is, I have used spellings of placenames as gleaned mainly from current maps of South Ronaldsay and Burray, or as suggested by either the pertinent family who may have lived or who currently lives at a particular place, or by Dave Annal and other Orcadian descendants or Orkney researchers.

On the transcript of the original enumeration document of the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census, there are instances of when a  "Do."  mark is not shown next to a numbered Census Household, e.g. the space where the placename would normally be located was left blank.  I have assumed in these cases that a  "Do."  mark is implied, and that the names of these Households are the same as the last placenames written down on the original transcript just prior to the Census Household which has a blank space by it.  These placenames are subsequently inserted, in red text, in my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section.  There are also at least two Census Households which have no Household Numbers indicated for them on the original images... in these cases, in my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section, I have inserted the appropriate Household Numbers in red text.

The transcript of the original enumeration document of the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census lists the Enumeration Districts (a total of eleven districts) as  "Hoxay, Fairwell, St Margt Hope, Blanster, Herston, Widewall, Sandwick, South Parish, Burray, Swona, [and] Pentland Skerries".  For one familiar with the island(s), it appears that two of these districts shown in this 1821 Census, St Margaret's Hope and Blanster, encompass what seems like far too many Census Households.  Dave Annal has recommended that I use in my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  a total of fourteen Enumeration Districts which he feels better represent a more accurate depiction of the placement of the Census Households: 
       "Hoxay -- Households  #1  -  #21,
        Fairwell -- Households  #22  -  #43,
        St. Margaret's Hope -- Households  #44  -  #82,
        Garth -- Households  #83  -  #99,
        Blanster -- Households  #100  -  #119,
        Grimness -- Households  #120  -  #178,
        East Side -- Households  #179  -  #234,
        Herston -- Households  #235  -  #243,
        Widewall -- Households  #244  -  #279,
        Sandwick -- Households  #280  -  #286,
        South Parish -- Households  #1  -  #117,
        Burray -- Households  #1  -  #50,
        Swona -- Households  #1  -  #7,
        Pentland Skerries -- Household  #1" 
Dave Annal stated, "The[se] districts are n[o]t always indicated in [this] census but [come] from my own knowledge and from later censuses..."

I have used Dave Annal's refined list of Enumeration Districts, but have chosen to spell the Enumeration Districts thusly:  "Hoxa, Farewell, St. Margaret's Hope, Garth, Blanster, Grimness, Eastside, Herston, Widewall, Sandwick, South Parish, Burray, Swona, Pentland Skerries".

The 'Household Index' (see "Navigating 'Lisa's Additional Research Notes' " at the top of all pages to find this hyperlink) utilizes both the redistricting of the Enumeration Districts as requested by Dave Annal, plus my own abovementioned interpretation of the modern, or more commonly used, spellings of these Enumeration Districts and of the names of Households.

Remember that accepted placenames are sometimes particular to certain decades, centuries, census enumerators, ministers, clerks, or even the family lines themselves.  Your family's spelling of the placename may differ from my own presentation of the placename as shown in the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section of this web site.



  Surnames . . . .

As a general rule, although I have taken an editorial stance of consistently using my own interpretation of the more modern, or commonly used, names of Households throughout the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section (in a sense, standardizing the placenames for easier reading), I have tended to favor using the exact spellings of first names and surnames as they are shown in Old Parish Register or Statutory Register entries, particularly if the names seemed unusual or even just slightly different in their spelling.  This is why you will note that many of the first names and last names of individuals shown in red text within my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section are usually shown within quotation marks, to represent how they were spelled in the original source material.  I feel that my showing you the variety of ways your ancestor's name was spelled in the old records may aid you in your further research of your own family history, potentially making your surname searches a bit easier when you visit web sites such as ScotlandsPeople.

First names and surnames shown in BLACK TEXT within the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section of this web site indicate the spelling as found on the transcript of the original enumeration document of the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census.  Since I found it easier, as a researcher, to search through a document looking first for an individual's surname, followed then by their first name, you will see that this was one of the editorial changes I made in reformatting the layout of the original 1821 Census.  In my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section, the columns' headings are just slightly different than on the original and are, from left to right:  Household Number, Household Name, Surname, Given Name (or first name), and Age in Census.  Once you begin viewing all of the material found in the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section, you will note that I also added another column, one depicting individuals' approximate years of birth as represented by the ages given for them in the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census.

Any single letters or any entire names which I myself have inserted into the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section are shown as  RED text with a white background.  In the original transcript belonging to the Annal family, many of the first names are abbreviated, so I have made the decision to spell out, in full, individuals' first names.  For example, "Margt" as seen in the original 1821 Census transcript would become "Margaret" in my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section.  Also added in red text are any nicknames or different spellings or variations of surnames that I have run across during my research which I feel may have been in common use for a person (normally these were indicated by Register entries).  You should not assume, however, that these nicknames, shortened names, or alternate surname spellings fully represent all of the possible variations.

Ditto marks are often given in the original 1821 Census transcript to represent a given surname of all the individuals who shared the same surname within one Household... in my  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section, I have inserted what would have been the surname for a person as implied by a ditto mark.  To add to this information, I have also tried to insert the Maiden Surnames of women for whom I knew such information.  In the  'Lisa's Additional Research Notes'  section, the Maiden Surname I have provided replaces the woman's married surname.

There are particular surnames depicted in the transcript of the original enumeration document of the South Ronaldsay, Burray, Swona and Pentland Skerries 1821 Census which, for the purposes of this web site, I found it easier in my Surname Index and on other web pages to just keep the spelling as it was presented in the original 1821 Census.  One of these surnames is "Woldrage"  -  this same spelling was kept as such in my Surname Index (even though this 1821 Census shows the only instance in all my years of study that I have seen this particular surname spelled this way), but it does have many variations, such as "Wooldrage", "Woolridge", and "Wooldridge".  Another example is that I also kept "Halcrow" the same in the Surname Index, although I believe the most common spelling is perhaps "Halcro".  You will note that "Rusland" has several variations, even among close family members:  "Russland", "Russell", and "Russel".  The surname "Cursater" (as used in the Surname Index) also has many variations  -  I found spellings such as "Cusator", "Cursitor", and "Cusiter", et cetera. 
I could come up with many examples of the surname variations... the original transcript for the 1821 Census has "Omond" for "Omand" in Widewall's Census Household #267;  in another Household, "Derin" was used when "Durran" was most likely the surname;  "Symison" is shown in the original, though I believe that "Simison" could be in common usage today;  there are some instances of "Gutchard" being used when, clearly, the surname should be "Gutcher".  Your family may have identified with a specific spelling of your surname through the years.
 Surname variations as were found within the original sources I have marked in quotes -   "     "